Study Abroad

The Department strongly recommends that all Spanish majors include a period of study in a Spanish-speaking country in the course of their undergraduate education. Although the 4-year graduation guarantee does not apply to those who study abroad, it is still entirely possible to go abroad for a semester or a year and graduate in 4 years. Our Outlines of Course Completion (available in the Undergraduate Manual) show some of the possibilities. For International Spanish for the Professions Majors, formal admission to the major is required before departure.

The Department of Spanish and Portuguese Sponsors two Study Abroad Programs, one to Rosario, Argentina, and one to Barcelona, Spain

Study Abroad Advising

If you are majoring in Spanish for the Professions, please contact Prof. Mary Long.

 If you are majoring in Spanish Language and Literature or in Spanish and Portuguese Languages and Cultures, please contact Prof. Javier Rivas.

If you are going to spend a semester / a year studying abroad in Latin America, Spain or Portugal, it is imperative that you meet with a study abroad advisor in order to discuss your case prior to your departure. Spanish Language and Literature, and Spanish and Portuguese Language and Culture majors should meet with Professor Javier Rivas. International Spanish for the Professions majors should meet with Professor Mary K. Long

Here are some tips to make that meeting most productive and expedient:

The Study Abroad Advisor does not research / choose a program for you. You do that yourself, sometimes in consultation with the Office of International Education. You should make that decision based on your specific needs, career goals, personal preferences, and timing. The Study Abroad Advisor cannot and will not recommend one program or another, since this goes beyond his/her duties. Once you have decided where and when you are going to study, you should find out which classes are offered during the terms that you are planning to stay. Do not come to the meeting with the whole catalog, since most times only a fraction of those classes are offered any given semester.  Once you have this information you can come to the Office Hours of the Study Abroad Advisor. You should bring the following materials:

  1. Up-to-date Major sheet. The Study Abroad Advisor cannot make an informed decision on which equivalencies to give or courses to recommend if s/he does not know where you stand in your career.
  2. Course descriptions / Catalog for the program.

Please do not come to the meeting without these materials.

You have to meet in person with the department Study Abroad Advisor, Prof. Javier Rivas. Advising will not be given through email. Courses will not be approved through email.

You have to plan ahead. You should plan your meeting with time to spare.

The Department of Spanish and Portuguese sponsors two Study Abroad Global Seminars, one in Rosario, Argentina, and one in Barcelona, Spain

The Study Abroad Global Seminar to Rosario, Argentina is offered each summer from early June to mid July. This intensive 5 week program, based in the private university Fundación del Gran Rosario offers 6 credit hours to its participants (there will be one culture class and one literature class offered each year), an all-expense included home stay with an Argentine family, several cultural excursions and guest lectures by local intellectuals and much more. The program director is Dr. Susan Hallstead, Senior Instructor in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese. You may contact Dr. Hallstead or visit the Study Abroad website for more information

The Study Abroad Global Seminar  to Barcelona, Spain, is directed by Javier Krauel, a native of Barcelona and an Assistant Professor in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese. The 3-credit Barcelona course will be offered each June. “Barcelona: Understanding Local and Immigrant Cultures” is a three-week, interdisciplinary Global Seminar that explores how different ethnic groups have shaped the history of Barcelona, a cosmopolitan city that is one of the oldest in Europe and the capital of one of the most vibrant and modern regions in Spain, Catalonia. Students will live with Spanish host families, attend class at the Casa Convalescència (Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Sant Pau campus), and take part in various tours and site visits (Barri Gòtic, Museu Picasso, Gran Teatre del Liceu, Sagrada Família, etc.). You may contact Prof. Krauel or visit the Study Abroad website for more information

In addition to this, a list of the programs abroad with which the University of Colorado is currently affiliated is available in the Office of International Education. Credit received through these programs is considered CU credit (as opposed to transfer credit). Credit earned elsewhere is evaluated on an individual basis. These approved programs are administered by the Office of International Education located in the Environmental Design Building, Boulder Campus. A student interested in participating in one of these programs should inquire at OIE regarding the starting time, application procedures and costs.

 Attendance at non-University of Colorado programs is frequently acceptable if the program is operated by an accredited institution in the United States. However, no advising can be done until the student returns and the credit appears on the CU transcript. Credit earned in commercial language schools abroad is usually not accepted, and care should be taken in choosing such options if credit toward a degree at the University of Colorado is a concern, since such schools often do not issue transcripts or maintain proper attendance requirements to qualify for acceptance.

 

Credit for work done at special programs offered by foreign universities will be evaluated on an individual basis. The student is urged to consult with the Department prior to attendance (the Study Abroad Advisor, Prof. Javier Rivas), since the amount and level of credit may vary considerably in individual cases. For all other matters and details, please contact the Office of International Education.

Students who present either transfer work or credits earned in Study Abroad programs will be required to complete at least 12 upper-division credits on the Boulder Campus, six of which must be from the masterpiece courses for Spanish literature majors and Span 3040 / Span 4070 for International Spanish for the Professions Majors, as well as Span 3100. This will be required even though the total number of credits in Spanish may exceed 45 and, therefore, will not be counted toward graduation.

The content of the course, not only the language used in the classroom, is the factor which determines whether the course is counted as Spanish. Spanish credit will be given only for courses in literature, language, linguistics, or the culture and civilization of the Hispanic world, or for a pre-approved internship course for International Spanish for the Professions majors.

Most equivalencies given for Study abroad courses are for electives and for related field or area classes. Read the following to understand what they are. This will also help you make educated decisions when you are abroad.

An elective class is a class offered by the Department of Spanish and Portuguese, on a periodic basis. These classes are devoted to: Literature (e.g., Span 3340, Span 4220), Culture and Civilization (e.g., Span 3200, Span 3220), Language (e.g., Span 3002, Span 4010), Linguistics (Span 3150, Span 4430), and Film.

If you took a class abroad pertaining to any of the aforementioned topics, it may count as an elective, at the 3000 or 4000 level depending on the class.

A related field or area course is a class that you take outside the Department of Spanish and Portuguese. In general, these classes may pertain to History, Economics, Political Science, Art, Ethnic Studies, Anthropology, Religious Studies, among other possibilities. Please consult the Undergraduate Handbook for specifics related to each of the tracks of the major in this category. 

In order for a class taken at CU or abroad to be counted towards your major it has to deal with Spain, Spanish America (any country), or a specific professional area (for International Spanish for the Professions majors). 

For example: "Archeology of Mesoamerica" can be considered a RF (the Spanish Department does not offer it—that is what makes it RF—but it is relevant to your knowledge of Latin America). "History of the Worker's Movement" cannot be considered as a RF towards your major unless you can prove that more than half of it was devoted to the Hispanic world.Mutatis mutandi the same goes for any class taken abroad. 

Please, take the aforementioned criteria into account in the eventuality that you are to register without a previous meeting with the Study Abroad advisor. It will save you problems when you come back.

You should meet again with the Study Abroad Advisor Prof. Javier Rivas, in order to confirm the equivalencies that were tentatively given.

You should bring the following materials:

  1.  Up-to-date University Transcript (unofficial) showing that you successfully completed the courses.
  2. Hard copies of the syllabi of all courses taken abroad.
  3. Up-to-date Major sheet.

Please do not come to the meeting without all of these materials.

You will receive a form, signed by the Study Abroad Advisor, confirming the equivalencies given. Do not lose this form. It is the only proof you have that the courses that you took abroad count towards your major.

If you did not meet with the Study Abroad Advisor prior to traveling, you should not count on the fact that any credit will be given. If the program you were in was a CU program, there is a possibility, but equivalencies depend also on your status (i.e. requirements pending, etc.)

 If you want your courses evaluated in order to assess possible equivalencies towards your major, you will need to meet with the Study Abroad Advisor (Prof. Javier Rivas) urgently, in person (no e-mail inquiry will be honored), during his/her office hours (no walk-ins). You need to bring to the meeting the following materials:

  1.  Up-to-date University Transcript (unofficial) showing that you successfully completed the courses.
  2. Hard copies of the syllabi of all courses taken abroad
  3. Up-to-date Major sheet.

 Please do not come to the meeting without all of these materials.

 You will receive a form, signed by the Study Abroad Advisor, confirming the equivalences given. Do not lose this form. It is the only proof you have that the courses that you took abroad count towards your major.